The Leadership Quarterly

  • Charismatic rhetoric, integrative complexity and the U.S. Presidency: An analysis of the State of the Union Address (SOTU) from George Washington to Barack Obama
    Publication date: Available online 20 April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Ben Wasike

    This study advances Thoemmes and Conway’s seminal work on integrative complexity (IC) of U.S. presidents by examining the relationship between IC and charisma in the State of the Union address. I examined a census of SOTU addresses given from George Washington to Barack Obama using Boas Shamir’s self-concept based motivational charisma construct. IC and charisma were positively related for presidents in the first terms in office; however, this relation only held for presidents who eventually won reelection. Data also confirmed a positive correlation between charisma and the likelihood of reelection. I describe various trends in the data with respect to charisma and IC for time in office. Overall findings that using IC in leadership studies may be a worthwhile endeavor, as is measuring charisma by computer given that this measure correlated reasonably well with measures of charisma derived from other sources.





  • Top management team faultlines and firm performance: Examining the CEO-TMT interface
    Publication date: Available online 6 April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Dimitrios Georgakakis, Peder Greve, Winfried Ruigrok

    Prior research indicates that the relationship between top management team (TMT) faultlines and firm performance is equivocal. We shed new light on this topic by highlighting the moderating role of the CEO–TMT interface. Analyzing data from large international firms over the period 2005–2009 (347 firm-year combinations), we find that the performance effect of knowledge-based TMT faultlines is significantly altered when the leader of the TMT (i.e., the CEO): (a) socio-demographically resembles incumbent executives, (b) possesses a diverse career background, and (c) shares common socialization experience with other TMT members. Overall, our research reveals that different dimensions of the CEO-TMT interface play a pivotal role in determining the performance effects of knowledge-based TMT subgroups. Implications for upper echelons theory, team diversity, and strategic leadership research are discussed.





  • Editorial Board
    Publication date: April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 2









  • Dynamic viewpoints on implicit leadership and followership theories: Approaches, findings, and future directions
    Publication date: April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 2

    Author(s): Roseanne J. Foti, Tiffany Keller Hansbrough, Olga Epitropaki, Patrick T. Coyle







  • Effects of relational schema congruence on leader-member exchange
    Publication date: April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 2

    Author(s): Chou-Yu Tsai, Shelley D. Dionne, An-Chih Wang, Seth M. Spain, Francis J. Yammarino, Bor-Shiuan Cheng

    Drawing on social exchange processes in leader-member exchange (LMX), we posit that expressive relational schema (ERS) and instrumental relational schema (IRS), which refer to knowledge structures in social exchange processes, act as antecedents of follower-rated LMX. Specifically, we discuss how leader-follower relational schema congruence/incongruence informs follower-rated LMX. Using polynomial regression models, we analyze 205 leader-follower dyads and test the congruent/incongruent effects on follower-rated LMX. The findings show that ERS congruence has a positive effect on follower-rated LMX, while IRS congruence has a negative effect on follower-rated LMX. Results also demonstrate that ERS incongruence impairs more follower-rated LMX than does ERS congruence, and IRS incongruence and IRS congruence have the same follower-rated LMX. Implications for LMX theory and research are discussed.





  • Are there advantages to seeing leadership the same? A test of the mediating effects of LMX on the relationship between ILT congruence and employees' development
    Publication date: April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 2

    Author(s): Brandon S. Riggs, Christopher O.L.H. Porter

    Although there has been an increased interest in implicit leadership theories (ILTs) over the last two decades, only a handful of studies have examined the effects of ILT congruence among leader-follower dyads. Just as important, this research has largely suggested few effects for ILT congruence, focused exclusively on prototype congruence, examined a limited number of potential outcomes, and has failed to examine questions about ILT congruence utilizing the most appropriate statistical approaches. We examine the effects of ILT congruence, with an explicit focus on the possibility that congruence between supervisors and their employees on both prototypes and antiprototypes impacts the LMX developed within their dyads. We predict that LMX, in turn, affects employees’ opportunities to engage in developmental activities. Using a sample of 74 matched pairs of supervisors and employees and polynomial regression and response surface methodology, we found that congruence between supervisors’ and employees’ prototypes positively influenced LMX. We also found limited evidence that LMX explained the effects of this congruence on employees’ engagement in developmental activities. Although we found no evidence of antiprototype congruence effects, supervisors who rated antiprototypical traits as characteristic of leaders had lower LMX with their employees.





  • Incorporating temporality into implicit leadership and followership theories: Exploring inconsistencies between time-based expectations and actual behaviors
    Publication date: April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 2

    Author(s): Kent K. Alipour, Susan Mohammed, Patricia N. Martinez

    Given that time is such a critical contextual variable in organizations and effectiveness indicators rarely exclude timeliness, we argue that temporal individual differences are an unfortunate omission from implicit leadership theories (ILTs) and implicit followership theories (IFTs). Both implicit theories and time-based individual differences are commonly undiscussed, but their subtle effects can manifest explicitly in behaviors and consequences that have real implications for leaders and followers in organizations. Therefore, in this conceptual paper, we draw attention to time patience (the extent to which individuals are unconcerned with or unfocused on deadlines and the passage of time), time perspective (the relative importance of past, present, and future events in ongoing thought processes and decision-making), polychronicity (the preference for multitasking), and pacing style (the manner in which individuals distribute their effort over time in working toward deadlines) as neglected, but research-worthy components of followers’ ILTs and leaders’ IFTs. By infusing time-related characteristics into leadership research, we not only consider the content and structure of temporal ILTs and IFTs, but also draw attention to potential inconsistency in leaders’ temporal IFTs and followers’ actual behaviors, as well as followers’ temporal ILTs and leaders’ actual behaviors. Further, we offer propositions that have prescriptive value in specifying the conditions under which temporal ILT and IFT inconsistency will be more or less detrimental to leader-follower coordination.





  • “Facing” leaders: Facial expression and leadership perception
    Publication date: April 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 2

    Author(s): Savvas Trichas, Birgit Schyns, Robert Lord, Rosalie Hall

    This experimental study investigated the effect of a leader’s expression of happy versus nervous emotions on subsequent perceptions of leadership and ratings of traits associated with implicit leadership theories (ILTs). Being fast and universally understood, emotions are ideal stimuli for investigating the dynamic effects of ILTs, which were understood in this study in terms of the constraints that expressed emotions impose on the connectionist networks that activate ILTs. The experimental design contrasted videotaped and still frame presentations of a leadership event; however, this methodological factor had no significant effects and analyses were thus collapsed across this factor. Key findings were that the expression of a happy versus nervous emotion at the end of a problem-solving sequence had multiple effects: happy emotions resulted in higher leadership ratings, higher trait ratings, greater correlations among trait ratings, and greater dependence of trait ratings on leadership perceptions. An exploratory model suggested that leadership impressions mediated the effects of facial emotions on trait ratings. The discussion further links the study findings with interpretations in terms of ILTs and many types of constraints on these cognitive structures. It also suggests ways to integrate these ideas with advances in neuroscience research.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/10489843

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