The Leadership Quarterly

  • Moving beyond the employee: The role of the organizational context in leader workplace aggression
    Publication date: Available online 16 December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Payal Nangia Sharma

    Management and psychology scholars are increasingly seeking to examine how organizational characteristics that contextualize leadership shape the occurrence, impact, and prevention of leader workplace aggression. However, a comprehensive review of this literature has not yet been conducted, so a systematic understanding is lacking regarding questions including: (1) when, why and how is such aggression more likely to occur; (2) how do contextual factors enable or constrain effects of these leader behaviors on employees; and (3) how can organizations proactively manage their internal dynamics to prevent or reduce such incidences? Drawing on Porter and McLaughlin’s (2006) components of organizational context, I review existing leader aggression research that intersects with seven categories: (1) culture/climate; (2) goals/purposes; (3) people/composition; (4) processes; (5) state/condition; (6) structure; and (7) time. I then offer theoretical propositions for future work, which are grounded in the roles and responsibilities inherent to the nature of leadership and coupled with the changing nature of organizational life. As a result, I set the research agenda for the next decade of organizational context×leader workplace aggression studies.





  • Leader individual differences, situational parameters, and leadership outcomes: A comprehensive review and integration
    Publication date: Available online 13 December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Stephen J. Zaccaro, Jennifer P. Green, Samantha Dubrow, MaryJo Kolze

    In this article, we provide a wide-ranging review of recent research on leader individual differences. The review focuses specifically on the explosion of such research in the last decade. The first purpose of this review is to summarize and integrate various conceptual frameworks describing how leader attributes influence leader emergence and leader effectiveness. The second purpose is to provide a comprehensive review of empirical research on this relationship. Also, most prior reviews primarily examined leader personality traits; this review includes a broader array of leader attributes, including cognitive capacities, personality, motives and values, social skills, and knowledge and expertise. The final broad purpose of this paper is to review and integrate situational and contextual parameters into our conceptual framing of leader individual differences. Few, if any, prior reviews have systematically accounted for the critical role of such parameters in cuing, activating, or delimiting the effects of particular leader attributes. We do so in this article.





  • Blazing new trails or opportunity lost? Evaluating research at the intersection of leadership and entrepreneurship
    Publication date: Available online 8 December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Shane W. Reid, Aaron H. Anglin, John E. Baur, Jeremy C. Short, M. Ronald Buckley

    More than a decade ago, scholars formally conceptualized the potential synergy between leadership and entrepreneurship scholarship. Our work highlights research accomplishments occurring at the interface of these two intellectual areas as well as identifying untapped possibilities for continued research. We highlight how recent efforts have witnessed a mutual exchange of ideas that present opportunities benefiting both fields. Drawing from four key domains of entrepreneurship previously proposed to mutually inform future leadership research efforts, we make suggestions for integrating entrepreneurial opportunities, the roles of individual and entrepreneurial teams, the modes of organizing entrepreneurial ventures, and differing entrepreneurial environments with key trends important to leadership research, such as servant leadership and leader-member exchange theory. Overall, our work provides an assessment of the state of the art surrounding the coalescence of leadership and entrepreneurship research and sets an agenda for the next decade of research at this intersection.





  • Leader-member exchange and organizational citizenship behaviors: Contextual effects of leader power distance and group task interdependence
    Publication date: Available online 6 December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Smriti Anand, Prajya Vidyarthi, Sandra Rolnicki

    In this paper we explore the context of the relationship between leader-member exchange and organizational citizenship behaviors (OCB). We maintain that workgroup leader’s power distance and the extent of task interdependence in the group exert cross-level effects on the LMX-OCB relationship. We assert that leader power distance attenuates the relationship between LMX and OCB, and this effect is stronger in workgroups with high degree of task interdependence. Results of hierarchical linear modeling analysis of data gathered from 245 employees nested in 54 workgroups supported our hypotheses. LMX-OCB relationship was weaker in workgroups led by high power distance leaders. Further, the three-way cross-level interaction between LMX, leader power distance and group task interdependence demonstrated that the tendency for LMX to have a stronger positive effect on OCB when leader power distance was low rather than high was more pronounced in high task interdependence teams.





  • Inside front cover – Editorial Board
    Publication date: December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6









  • CEO succession, strategic change, and post-succession performance: A meta-analysis
    Publication date: December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6

    Author(s): Donald J. Schepker, Youngsang Kim, Pankaj C. Patel, Sherry M.B. Thatcher, Michael C. Campion

    The relationship between CEO succession and firm outcomes is often examined through the disruption or adaptation perspectives. These two perspectives, however, have evolved separately. We propose that findings from these separate streams of research can be integrated, and thus a more holistic understanding of CEO succession can be afforded, through focusing on the central factor responsible for their differences—distinct temporal foci of these streams. The disruption perspective suggests CEO succession imposes costs on organizations, which influences short-term performance. The adaptation perspective suggests CEO succession requires time for effects to manifest, which implies a lagged effect on performance. Based on a meta-analysis of 60 samples from 1972 to 2013 representing 13,578 successions, we find CEO succession negatively influences performance in the short-term and has no significant direct influence on long-term performance. Long-term performance effects, instead, are mediated by strategic change and new CEO origin (inside vs. outside the firm). Inside CEOs improve long-term performance and engage in less strategic change, while hiring an outside CEO leads to more strategic change that results in lower long-term performance. Forced or unforced turnover is not related to short- or long-term performance. Board independence influences relationships between forced turnover and firm performance, as well as CEO origin and strategic change.





  • Performance feedback, power retention, and the gender gap in leadership
    Publication date: December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6

    Author(s): Julia B. Bear, Lily Cushenbery, Manuel London, Gary D. Sherman

    We propose that performance feedback can be a power retention mechanism that puts women at a relative disadvantage and contributes to the lack of women in leadership positions. Feedback is an evaluative process, with the (typically higher-power) source often having considerable discretion and means to deliver feedback and the feedback recipient often being at the mercy of the will of the source. The feedback process, therefore, has a built-in power component that preserves and amplifies existing power differences in organizations (e.g., differences in organizational authority and rank) and disproportionately harms women’s leadership development. We develop a theoretical model concerning how power retention conditions (e.g., when giving feedback advances the source’s personal status goals) lead to power retention mechanisms in the feedback process, such as patronizing feedback, particularly for female recipients. We discuss how gender moderates feedback delivery and reactions to feedback, which influence the persistent gender gap in leadership, subsequently reinforcing the power retention conditions. We conclude by discussing areas for future research, potential power equalization forces, and practical suggestions for how organizations can change this cycle.





  • Top management team faultlines and firm performance: Examining the CEO-TMT interface
    Publication date: December 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 6

    Author(s): Dimitrios Georgakakis, Peder Greve, Winfried Ruigrok

    Prior research indicates that the relationship between top management team (TMT) faultlines and firm performance is equivocal. We shed new light on this topic by highlighting the moderating role of the CEO–TMT interface. Analyzing data from large international firms over the period 2005–2009 (347 firm-year combinations), we find that the performance effect of knowledge-based TMT faultlines is significantly altered when the leader of the TMT (i.e., the CEO): (a) socio-demographically resembles incumbent executives, (b) possesses a diverse career background, and (c) shares common socialization experience with other TMT members. Overall, our research reveals that different dimensions of the CEO-TMT interface play a pivotal role in determining the performance effects of knowledge-based TMT subgroups. Implications for upper echelons theory, team diversity, and strategic leadership research are discussed.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/10489843

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