The Leadership Quarterly

  • Leadership and generations at work: A critical review
    Publication date: Available online 2 October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Cort W. Rudolph, Rachel S. Rauvola, Hannes Zacher

    We present a critical review of theory, empirical research, and practical applications regarding generational differences in leadership phenomena. First, we consider the concept of generations both historically and through contemporary arguments related to leadership. Second, we outline and refute various myths surrounding the idea of generational differences in general, and critique leadership theories that have been influenced by these myths. Third, we describe the results of a literature review of primary empirical studies that have invoked the notion of generational differences to understand leadership phenomena. Finally, we argue that the lifespan developmental perspective represents a useful alternative to generational representations, as it better captures age-related dynamics that are relevant to leadership, followership, and leadership development. Ultimately, our work serves as a formal call for a moratorium to be placed upon the application of the ideas of generations and generational differences to leadership theory, research, and practice.





  • We can do it! Inclusive leader language promotes voice behavior in multi-professional teams
    Publication date: Available online 2 October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Mona Weiss, Michaela Kolbe, Gudela Grote, Donat R. Spahn, Bastian Grande

    Although it is known that leaders can have a strong impact on whether employees voice work-related ideas or concerns, no research has investigated the impact of leader language on voice—particularly in professionally diverse contexts. Based on a social identity approach as well as on collectivistic leadership theories, we distinguish between implicit (i.e., First-Person Plural pronouns) and explicit (i.e., invitations and appreciations) inclusive leader language and test its effects on voice in multi-professional teams. We hypothesized that implicit inclusive leader language promotes voice especially among team members sharing the same professional group membership as the leader (in-group team members) while explicit inclusive leader language promotes voice especially among team members belonging to a different professional group (out-group team members). These hypotheses were tested in a field setting in which 126 health care professionals (i.e., nurses, resident and attending physicians), organized in 26 teams, managed medical emergencies. Behavioral coding and leader language analyses supported our hypotheses: Leaders’ “WE”-references were more strongly related to residents’ (in-group) and explicit invitations related more strongly to nurses’ (out-group) voice behavior. We discuss how inclusive leader language promotes employee voice and explain why group membership functions as an important moderator in professionally diverse teams.





  • Inside front cover – Editorial Board
    Publication date: October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5









  • CEO humility, narcissism and firm innovation: A paradox perspective on CEO traits
    Publication date: October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5

    Author(s): Hongyu Zhang, Amy Y. Ou, Anne S. Tsui, Hui Wang

    We examine how two seemingly contradictory yet potentially complementary CEO traits—humility and narcissism—interact to affect firm innovation. We adopt a paradox perspective and propose that individuals can have paradoxical traits and that, in particular, humility and narcissism can coexist harmoniously, especially among the Chinese, whose philosophical tradition embraces paradoxical thinking and behaving. CEOs that are both humble and narcissistic are hypothesized to be more likely to have socialized charisma, to cultivate an innovative culture, and to deliver innovative performance. Two studies using multisource data involving 63 CEOs, 328 top managers, and 645 middle managers in Study 1 and 143 CEOs and 190 top managers in Study 2 support the hypotheses and point to new directions for studying CEO traits and their effects on firm outcomes.





  • Am I a leader? Examining leader identity development over time
    Publication date: October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5

    Author(s): Darja Miscenko, Hannes Guenter, David V. Day

    The extent to which someone thinks of him- or herself as a leader (i.e., leader identity) is subject to change in a dynamic manner because of experience and structured intervention, but is rarely studied as such. In this study, we map the trajectories of leader identity development over a course of a seven-week leader development program. Drawing upon identity theory (Kegan, 1983) and self-perception theory (Bem, 1972), we propose that changes in self-perceived leadership skills are associated with changes in leader identity. Using latent growth curve modeling and latent change score analyses as our primary analytical approaches, we analyzed longitudinal data across seven measurement points (N =98). We find leader identity to develop in a J-shaped pattern. As hypothesized, we find that these changes in leader identity are associated with, and potentially shaped by, changes in leadership skills across time.





  • Take it to the top: Imagined interactions with leaders elevates organizational identification
    Publication date: October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5

    Author(s): Rose Meleady, Richard J Crisp

    Organizational identification is an important predictor of workplace behavior. The more strongly an individual identifies with their employing organization, the more motivated they will be to behave in ways that promote its success. In this paper we develop a new approach to fostering organizational identification based on principles of mental simulation. Across seven experiments we demonstrate that imagining positive contact with an organizational leader increases identification with the organization they represent. Experiments 1A, 1B, 2A, 2B, 3A and 3B replicated the basic effect against progressively varied control conditions, utilizing both scenario and field experiments. Experiment 4 demonstrated that as a consequence of heightened organizational identification following the imagined contact task, participants reported greater intentions to engage in organizational citizenship behaviors. We conclude by discussing the potential application of this technique as a simple and effective way for organizations to foster employees’ motivation and performance.





  • How leader humility helps teams to be humbler, psychologically stronger, and more effective: A moderated mediation model
    Publication date: October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5

    Author(s): Arménio Rego, Bradley Owens, Susana Leal, Ana I. Melo, Miguel Pina e Cunha, Lurdes Gonçalves, Paula Ribeiro

    We hypothesize that (a) the level of humility expressed by leaders predicts team performance through, serially, team humility and team PsyCap, and (b) the strength (i.e., consensus within the team) of the leader humility, team humility and team PsyCap moderates the paths of that hypothesized model. A sample comprising 82 teams (82 leaders; 332 team members) was collected. Team members reported leader humility, team humility and team PsyCap. Leaders reported team performance. To handle the risks of common method bias, each mediating path of the hypothesized model is based on data from two different subsamples within each team. Our model’s most novel theoretical contribution is the (moderated mediated) connection between leader humility, collective humility, and team PsyCap, and this was consistently supported in our data. Our inconsistent findings dealing with the relationship between team PsyCap and performance is well established in the literature and our results in both sub-samples were in the theorized direction. The study contributes to understand why, how and when humble leaders are more effective.





  • The impact of a workplace terrorist attack on employees' perceptions of leadership: A longitudinal study from pre- to postdisaster
    Publication date: October 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 5

    Author(s): Marianne Skogbrott Birkeland, Morten Birkeland Nielsen, Marianne Bang Hansen, Stein Knardahl, Trond Heir

    A terrorist attack targeting a workplace represents an organizational crisis that requires the leaders to manage emerging threats. The changing roles and expectations of the leaders are reflected in the employees’ perceptions of them over time. The purpose of this study was to determine whether the 2011 Oslo bombing attack affected the targeted employees’ perceptions of the leadership behaviors of their immediate superiors or the organizational managers’ interest in the health and well-being of their workers. Ministerial employees (n180) completed questionnaires on fair, empowering, and supportive leadership, in addition to human resource primacy, on two occasions several years prior to the terrorist attack. Assessments were then repeated one, two, and three years after the attack. Changes in the course of perceived leadership from predisaster to postdisaster were examined using bootstrapped t-tests and latent growth curve models. Furthermore, the general course of perceived leadership was compared with a nonexposed control sample of matched employees. Results showed that employees with high levels of posttraumatic stress perceived their immediate leader to be less supportive. However, overall perceptions of leadership were remarkably stable, which suggests that the effects of critical incidents on perceptions of leadership may be negligible.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/10489843

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