The Leadership Quarterly

  • “See You in Court”: How CEO narcissism increases firms' vulnerability to lawsuits
    Publication date: Available online 10 August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly

    Author(s): Charles A. O’Reilly, Bernadette Doerr, Jennifer A. Chatman

    Although some researchers have suggested that narcissistic CEOs may have a positive influence on organizational performance (e.g., Maccoby, 2007; Patel & Cooper, 2014), a growing body of evidence suggests that organizations led by narcissistic CEOs experience considerable downsides, including evidence of increased risk taking, overpaying for acquisitions, manipulating accounting data, and even fraud. In the current study we show that narcissistic CEO’s subject their organizations to undue legal risk because they are overconfident about their ability to win and less sensitive to the costs to their organizations of such litigation. Using a sample of 32 firms, we find that those led by narcissistic CEOs are more likely to be involved in litigation and that these lawsuits are more protracted. In two follow-up experimental studies, we examine the mechanism underlying the relationship between narcissism and lawsuits and find that narcissists are less sensitive to objective assessments of risk when making decisions about whether to settle a lawsuit and less willing to take advice from experts. We discuss the implications of our research for advancing theories of narcissism and CEO influence on organizational performance.





  • Inside front cover – Editorial Board
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4









  • Charisma: New frontiers
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4

    Author(s): John Antonakis, William L. Gardner







  • Charisma as signal: An evolutionary perspective on charismatic leadership
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4

    Author(s): Allen Grabo, Brian R. Spisak, Mark van Vugt

    We present an evolutionary perspective on charismatic leadership, arguing that charisma has evolved as a credible signal of a person’s ability to solve a coordination challenge requiring urgent collective action from group members. We suggest that a better understanding of charisma’s evolutionary and biological origins and functions can provide a broader perspective in which to situate current debates surrounding the utility and validity of charismatic leadership as a construct in the social sciences. We outline several key challenges which have shaped our followership psychology, and argue that the benefits of successful coordination in ancestral environments has led to the evolution of context-dependent psychological mechanisms which are especially attuned to cues and signals of outstanding personal leadership qualities. We elaborate on several implications of this signaling hypothesis of charismatic leadership, including opportunities for deception (dishonest signaling) and for large-scale coordination.





  • The aura of charisma: A review on the embodiment perspective as signaling
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4

    Author(s): Susan Reh, Niels Van Quaquebeke, Steffen R. Giessner

    Charismatic leaders have consistently been shown to affect followers’ performance, motivation, and satisfaction. Yet, what precisely constitutes charisma still remains somewhat enigmatic. So far, research has mainly focused on leader traits, leader behaviors, or the leader follower-relationship, and the subsequent consequences of each on followers’ self-concepts. All of these approaches share the notion that leader charisma depends on an explicit interaction between leader and follower. With the present review paper, we extend extant theorizing by arguing that charisma is additionally informed by embodied signals that flow directly from either the leader or the immediate environment. We introduce the embodiment perspective on human perception and describe its utility for theoretically understanding the charismatic effect. Correspondingly, we review studies that show which concrete embodied cues can support the charismatic effect. Finally, we discuss the variety of new theoretical and practical implications that arise from this research and how they can complement existing approaches to charismatic leadership.





  • A meta-analytic review and future research agenda of charismatic leadership
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4

    Author(s): George C. Banks, Krista N. Engemann, Courtney E. Williams, Janaki Gooty, Kelly Davis McCauley, Melissa R. Medaugh

    Charismatic leadership is a critical construct that draws much attention from both academic and practitioner literatures. Despite the positive attention received by the charisma construct, some have criticized its conceptualization and measurement. These critiques have, in turn, cast doubt on what we know regarding the antecedents and outcomes of charismatic leadership. In this review, we adopt a recently developed definition of charismatic leadership and then conduct a meta-analysis of its antecedents and objective outcomes. Following an examination of 76 independent studies and 36,031 individuals, results indicate that the Big Five traits and cognitive ability vary in their association with charismatic leadership. Other findings show that dimensions of charismatic leadership predict outcomes of interest, such as supervisor-rated task performance, supervisor-rated citizenship behaviors, and group or organization performance. Several shortcomings are identified, however, in testing theoretical and methodological moderating variables. The present research ultimately provides a roadmap for new frontiers in theoretical, measurement and empirical work on charismatic leadership.





  • Dying for charisma: Leaders' inspirational appeal increases post-mortem
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4

    Author(s): Niklas K. Steffens, Kim Peters, S. Alexander Haslam, Rolf van Dick

    In the present research, we shed light on the nature and origins of charisma by examining changes in a person’s perceived charisma that follow their death. We propose that death is an event that will strengthen the connection between the leader and the group they belong to, which in turn will increase perceptions of leaders’ charisma. In Study 1, results from an experimental study show that a scientist who is believed to be dead is regarded as more charismatic than the same scientist believed to be alive. Moreover, this effect was accounted for by people’s perceptions that the dead scientist’s fate is more strongly connected with the fate of the groups that they represent. In Study 2, a large-scale archival analysis of Heads of States who died in office in the 21st century shows that the proportion of published news items about Heads of State that include references to charisma increases significantly after their death. These results suggest that charisma is, at least in part, a social inference that increases after death. Moreover, they suggest that social influence and inspiration can be understood as products of people’s capacity to embody valued social groups.





  • The innate code of charisma
    Publication date: August 2017
    Source:The Leadership Quarterly, Volume 28, Issue 4

    Author(s): Omri Castelnovo, Micha Popper, Danny Koren

    We argue that the sources of charisma are innate and can be explained as part of unique human cultural transmission mechanisms. Recently, developmental models and experiments have been presented, for example, natural pedagogy theory (Csibra & Gergely, 2006, 2009, 2011) and over-imitation studies (Lyons, Young, & Keil, 2007; McGuigan, 2013). Inspired by these, we maintain that certain universal principles of conspicuous influence are embraced with very little critical thinking, on the basis of certain signals the charismatic leader radiates in a particular communicative manner (“evolutionary syntax”). We point out expressions of these principles in charismatic leadership and propose a conceptual framework that can advance the formulation of a general theory on charisma anchored in evolutionary processes.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/10489843

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