New Ideas in Psychology

  • Exploring wisdom in the Confucian tradition: Wisdom as manifested by Fan Zhongyan
    Publication date: April 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 41

    Author(s): Shih-ying Yang

    Exploring the wisdom manifested in the world’s great traditions can enhance our understanding of significant human strivings to live a meaningful and satisfying life and, at the same time, to help other people live better lives. This study focuses on Confucianism, which emphasizes self-cultivation and humaneness, and explores the wisdom manifested by Fan Zhongyan (989–1052), a Confucian scholar-official in Song-dynasty China and a model for Chinese intellectuals subsequently. Wisdom is defined as a process involving cognitive integration, embodying actions, and resulting positive effects for oneself and others. The study shows that Fan generated positive effects for himself and others through multiple efforts to embody his integrated idea,—being “the first to worry about the world’s troubles and the last to take pleasure in its happiness.” I also discuss a synergistic relationship between the manifestation of wisdom and the development of Confucianism, which may have implications for other great traditions as well.





  • The dual component theory of inhibition regulation: A new model of self-control
    Publication date: April 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 41

    Author(s): Joshua J. Reynolds, Sean M. McCrea

    Self-control is one of the most extensively studied topics in psychology and the resource or ego depletion model is one of the most popular. Although evidence supports some aspects of this model, other evidence is problematic for the notion that self-control is a limited resource. Herein, a new theory is proposed: the Dual Component Theory of Inhibition Regulation (DCTIR). The following paper will highlight key issues in self-control, describe the DCTIR, demonstrate how the DCTIR can account for the existing body of findings concerning limits to self-control, and provide novel predictions and avenues for further research.





  • Systemizing in autism: The case for an emotional mechanism
    Publication date: April 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 41

    Author(s): Geir Overskeid

    More often than others, people with autism engage in systemizing – attempts to understand and build rule-based systems. The mechanism behind the increased frequency of such behavior in autism is unknown, however. The assumption has long existed that emotions exist to motivate behavior, and there is now much evidence that people with autism tend to have stronger, more easily elicited emotions than the average person. This appears to be the cause of increased systemizing in autism – through a negative and a positive emotional pathway: There is evidence that autistic people want control more strongly than do others. This is often so, says the hypothesis, because strong negative emotions, other things equal, make lack of control feel more aversive than it does for most people. Systemizing can increase the feeling of control and hence reduce the negative emotion. Positive emotion can also motivate systemizing in autism – fascination and attraction more strongly felt and more easily elicited than in other people.





  • Inter- and En- activism: Some thoughts and comparisons
    Publication date: April 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 41

    Author(s): Mark H. Bickhard

    Interactivism and enactivism spring from some similar insights and intuitions. There are, however, some arguably significant divergences, and I will explore a few of the important similarities and differences. Topics addressed include the basic notions of how cognition and mind emerge in living systems; how growth, learning, development, and adaptation can be modeled within the basic frameworks; and how phenomenological investigations can be taken into account and their phenomena modeled.





  • Self as a second-order object: Reinterpreting the Jamesian “Me”
    Publication date: Available online 6 January 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology

    Author(s): Shanyang Zhao

    Existing definitions of the self can be lumped into three groups: self as self-reflectivity, self as self-concept, and self as the individual. This article traces current disagreements over the definition of the self to a crucial ambiguity in William James’s original delineation of the “Me.” Implicit in James’s delineation was a distinction between first-order objects and second-order objects: while first-order objects are things as they are, independent of the perception of a knowing subject, second-order objects are things as perceived by a knowing subject. This article makes this distinction explicit and argues that the self is a second-order object associated with the first-person or “emic” perspective. Defined as the empirical existence of the individual (first order) perceived by the individual as “me” or “mine” (second order), the self is distinguished from the “I” which is the mental capacity for self-reflection; the self-concept which is the mental representation of the individual’s existence; and the individual which is the empirical referent of the self-concept. As a second-order object, the “Me,” i.e., the self, is the unity of the existence and perception of the individual.





  • Editorial Board/Publication Information
    Publication date: January 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 40, Part A









  • Editorial Board/Publication Information
    Publication date: January 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 40, Part B









  • Explaining representation, naturally
    Publication date: January 2016
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 40, Part A

    Author(s): Marcin Miłkowski, Konrad Talmont-Kaminski







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