New Ideas in Psychology

  • Collective action as relational interaction: A new relational hypothesis on how non-activists become activists
    Publication date: October 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 39

    Author(s): Martijn van Zomeren

    Theory and research documents but does not explain the empirically observed different motivational profiles of activists and non-activists. For this reason, little is known about how non-activists become activists. Building on a broad literature that views humans as relational beings, I propose to reconceptualize collective action as social interaction that regulates social relationships (i.e., which relationships are individuals regulating, and how?) This facilitates an integrative understanding of the different motivational profiles for activists and non-activists (based in Fiske’s (1991) notion of different relational models with associated taboos and obligations to guide their regulation), which enables the development of a new relational hypothesis about how non-activists become activists (namely through two specific changes in relational models with one’s ingroup and outgroup, authority, or system, in response to taboo violations in social interaction). I discuss implications of this relational perspective for theory and research on collective action and psychological and social change.





  • Trajectory-based methods in clinical psychology: A person centred narrative approach
    Publication date: October 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 39

    Author(s): Kieron O’Connor, Marie Robert, Guilhème Pérodeau, Monique Séguin

    Life trajectories in clinical psychology research are often not treated as interactive trajectories but rather as static transversal variables. But developmental pathways are often cumulative and conditional and currently require sophisticated group-based modeling to tease out individual differences in trajectories. Clinical psychologists often require personal information on transitions and turning points in life which require eliciting information through qualitative life history approaches. A method is proposed for identifying life events within the person’s narrative and describing trajectories as event spaces likely to reflect end-point psychopathology.





  • The behavioral, experiential and conceptual dimensions of psychological phenomena: Body, soul and spirit
    Publication date: October 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 39

    Author(s): Ulrich Weger, Johannes Wagemann

    Psychological phenomena can be described on different levels of analysis: on an experiential level (e.g., what is it like to be attentive); and on a behavioral level (e.g., how does it become evident that someone is attentive). In the following, we outline how the widely prevalent focus on exclusively behavioral characteristics is insufficient and how our understanding of psychological phenomena can be enriched by taking the qualitative dimension of experience into consideration. We then scrutinize components of this experiential realm and report how it provides the stage for a third level: conceptual insight (e.g., what types or phases of attention can be distinguished). We subsequently look at the history of science and relate the behavioral aspect to the material realm (the realm of the body); the experiential aspect to what has been historically referred to as the soul realm; and the conceptual aspect to what has been historically referred to as the spirit realm. Finally, we add a first-person trial to delineate these concepts further and scrutinize them in light of contemporary theory-building.





  • Language as human ecology: A new agenda for linguistic education
    Publication date: Available online 17 June 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology

    Author(s): Alexander V. Kravchenko

    The efficiency of linguistic education based on the code model of language is questioned. The view of written language as a representation of speech ignores the important difference between the experientially different cognitive domains of speech and writing which affect human cognitive development by establishing an extended ecology of languaging. As a consequence, functional illiteracy in societies with established literate cultures becomes a real threat. It can be avoided when it is understood that language is a kind of socially driven behavior which contributes, in a quite definitive way, to the rich context of the human ecological niche, including texts, without which it cannot be understood.





  • Folk-linguistic fictions and the explananda of the language sciences
    Publication date: Available online 9 June 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology

    Author(s): Talbot J. Taylor

    For the past two millennia, the explananda of language theory have been inherited from the Western linguistic tradition. The legacy is what might be called “the Western linguistic imaginary”: An indeterminate but deeply mesmerizing inventory of entities, properties, and powers of language commonly attributed to language and language-users and which therefore seem to stand in need of explanation. In recent years, naturalistic research programs in the cognitive sciences have provided illuminating explanations of basic (“lower-order”) cognitive phenomena. The challenge today for the science of language is whether, in transforming itself along the lines of epistemological naturalism, it can provide similarly illuminating explanations of any of its traditional explananda. In addressing this challenge, greater attention needs to be given to the source of such explananda in the everyday, culturally-diverse practices of folk metalinguistics.





  • Editorial Board/Publication Information
    Publication date: June 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 38









  • Conceptual and pedagogical challenges in understanding the whole person
    Publication date: June 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 38

    Author(s): Eric Amsel

    The article introduces the special issues addressing Eric Johnson’s account of Form Psychology, which provides a conceptual method to scientifically study the whole person. Form Psychology is presented as a theoretically significant proposal that integrates multiple conceptualizations of the whole person. The pedagogical value of such an understanding is also emphasized as undergraduate psychology students hold strong intuitions that the person is an integrated whole rather than a set of distinct systems.





  • Reprint of: Mapping the field of the whole human: Toward a form psychology
    Publication date: June 2015
    Source:New Ideas in Psychology, Volume 38

    Author(s): Eric L. Johnson

    The concept of personality has served as the model of the whole human being within modern psychology for most of the 20th century. However, the original reasons for this selection were based on philosophical assumptions that have since come to be rejected by philosophers of science. Other approaches to the whole human have been identified within psychology, as well as philosophy and theology, which can also serve as models of the whole human in psychology, and which highlight additional, distinctly human kinds of psychological wholeness. The value of a number of the most important models will be discussed, and it will be suggested that the concept of form could serve as a higher-order concept for the psychological subdiscipline of the whole human being.





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