Journal of Applied Social Psychology

  • Need for closure and reactions to innovation

    Abstract

    In two studies using Italian (N = 852) and American (N = 94) samples, we hypothesized that high NFC individuals would have lower intentions to use new technological developments, and that this relationship would be mediated by anxiety about the new technology. We found support for this hypothesis in Study 1, but not Study 2. In the second study, we found that the closed-mindedness subscale of the full NFC scale was related to greater anxiety about new technology, which in turn led to lower intentions to use the new technology. This suggests that the closed-mindedness facet of NFC may have been responsible for our results. A meta-analytic synthesis of both studies provided some support for our original mediation hypothesis.

  • Reducing perceived social loafing in virtual teams: The effect of team feedback with guided reflexivity

    Abstract

    The aim of this study was twofold. The first aim was to study the effect of an intervention combining team feedback and guided reflexivity on virtual teams’ affective outcomes. The second was to examine the mediating role of perceived social loafing in this relationship. An experimental laboratory study was carried out with 54 teams randomly assigned to an experimental condition or a control condition. Results showed that this intervention had an effect on satisfaction with the result, but not on group cohesion and satisfaction with the team. Moreover, perceived social loafing fully mediated the effect of this intervention on group cohesion and partially mediated its effect on satisfaction with the team and the result.

  • An exploratory study of the relations between women miners' gender-based workplace issues and their mental health and job satisfaction

    Abstract

    The current study investigated the extent to which gender-based workplace issues were associated with women miners’ mental health and job satisfaction. Participants were 263 women miners from Australian and other international mines sites owned by an Australian-based mining company. They completed an online survey that contained measures of gender-based workplace issues, mental health, and job satisfaction. An exploratory factor analysis identified three higher-order factors: organizational sexism, interpersonal sexism, and sense of belonging. Both organizational and interpersonal sexism were positive independent predictors of mental health and job satisfaction. In addition, sense of belonging mediated the associations between organizational sexism and (a) mental health and (b) job satisfaction. Potential strategies for reducing organizational and interpersonal sexism and increasing women’s sense of belonging are considered.

  • The subjective group dynamics in negative campaigns

    Abstract

    I relied on the subjective group dynamics framework to analyse the derogation of inparty candidates involved in negative campaigns. In an experimental study (dynamic simulation of an electoral campaign, N = 118), I found that participants downgraded the inparty candidate (both in terms of evaluation and vote choice) more when he ran a person-based negative campaign than when he ran an issue-based negative campaign. This effect was significant for participants with high levels of political identification only. Overall, the findings revealed that political candidates, as members of significant social groups, are not exempt from the forms of extremity in evaluations typically observed in other social groups.

  • Think manager—think male, think follower—think female: Gender bias in implicit followership theories

    Abstract

    Because of the overlap between the social roles of women and followers, we predicted that people would show a bias, that is, favor female followers over male followers. To support this hypothesis, we conducted two studies: An explicit test of the bias using a scenario design and an implicit association test (IAT)-based study. Both studies show that the role of an ideal follower is more strongly associated with the female gender role, which seems to be caused partly by a more communal connotation of the follower role. This effect might contribute to the underrepresentation of women in leadership positions as they are perceived to be an ideal fit for followership positions; but it may also push men away from being followers and into leadership positions.

  • Prejudice, polyculturalism, and the influence of contact and moral exclusion: A comparison of responses toward LGBI, TI, and refugee groups

    Abstract

    Prejudice toward marginalized groups is recognized as a complex and harmful social issue. The present study investigates the role of polyculturalism in undermining prejudice toward lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex people and refugees. A pilot study (N = 76) compared participants’ prejudice, contact, and moral exclusion toward lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB) and transgender or intersex (TI) people. There were differences for three out of four variables; thus, LGB and TI variables were separated in the study proper (N = 154). In this study, we investigated moral exclusion and contact (quantity and quality) relating to LGB, TI, and refugee groups as simultaneous mediators of the relationship between polyculturalism and prejudice, while taking into account openness as per previous research. Structural equation modeling indicated that moral exclusion and contact quality acted as mediators between polyculturalism and prejudice for LGB people, TI people, and refugees.

  • Self-affirmation, political value congruence, and support for refugees

    Abstract

    This research tested the potential for self-affirmation on left- and right-wing political values to increase behavioral intentions to provide help and assistance to refugees. We present a pilot study defining left- and right-wing values, and a main study in which participants completed either a self-affirmation task, a group-affirmation task, or participated in a control condition on values that were either congruent or incongruent with their own political views. Results show that left-wing oriented participants showed more supportive intentions in the self-affirmation condition compared to the group-affirmation and control conditions, independent of values congruency. In contrast, right-wing participants showed more supportive intentions in the self-affirmation condition, but only when they affirmed on values that were congruent with their own political views.

  • Socially creative appraisals of rejection bolster ethnic migrants' subjective well-being

    Abstract

    We examined a proposition based on social identity theory that socially creative appraisals of rejection can boost the well-being of strongly identifying ethnic migrants. We piloted this proposition amongst women (N = 80) and found that strong (but not weak) group identifiers who considered the positive views that society holds about their social identity reported higher subjective wellbeing (self-esteem) relative to those who dwelt on rejection. In a subsequent field experiment (N = 179) conducted amongst ethnic migrants in London, we added a further social creativity treatment in which participants were encouraged to consider how they would view immigrants if they were native British (accommodation). Results revealed that the two social creativity mindsets (accommodation and positive) combined: (a) reduced perceptions of social rejection and increased optimism over the openness and fairness of society relative to a rejection mindset, (b) enhanced the self-esteem of strongly (but not weakly) identified ethnic migrants, and (c) enhanced ethnic migrant’s wellbeing by minimizing the recall of social rejection and by strengthening optimism over the host society’s openness and fairness. Implications for social change are discussed.

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/rss/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1559-1816

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