Warning: ksort() expects parameter 1 to be array, object given in /home/rferrell63/robertferrell.net/wp-content/plugins/bbpress/includes/core/template-functions.php on line 316
Educational Research Review

Educational Research Review

  • Systematically reviewing the potential of concept mapping technologies to promote self-regulated learning in primary and secondary science education
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 21

    Author(s): Matt P. Stevenson, Rikke Hartmeyer, Peter Bentsen

    We systematically searched five databases to assess the potential of concept mapping-based technologies to promote self-regulated learning in science education. Our search uncovered 17 relevant studies that investigated seven different types of learning technologies. We performed a narrative analysis assessing how each technology affects self-regulated learning through cognitive, metacognitive, and motivation strategies, according to Schraw et al. (2006)’s model. We suggest concept mapping technologies may affect self-regulated learning through enhancing these strategies to varying degrees. Computer software was particularly useful for developing cognitive strategies through ease of use. Teaching agents were particularly useful for developing metacognitive strategies by coupling visualisation of knowledge patterns with performance monitoring, aided by a teaching metaphor. Finally, mobile devices and teaching agents were most effective in enhancing motivation. Effects on knowledge gains remain unclear due to small sample sizes.





  • Socialising Epistemic Cognition
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 21

    Author(s): Simon Knight, Karen Littleton

    We draw on recent accounts of social epistemology to present a novel account of epistemic cognition that is ‘socialised’. In developing this account we foreground the: normative and pragmatic nature of knowledge claims; functional role that ‘to know’ plays when agents say they ‘know x’; the social context in which such claims occur at a macro level, including disciplinary and cultural context; and the communicative context in which such claims occur, the ways in which individuals and small groups express and construct (or co-construct) their knowledge claims. We frame prior research in terms of this new approach to provide an exemplification of its application. Practical implications for research and learning contexts are highlighted, suggesting a re-focussing of analysis on the collective level, and the ways knowledge-standards emerge from group-activity, as a communicative property of that activity.





  • Academic achievement of students without special educational needs in inclusive classrooms: A meta-analysis
    Publication date: June 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 21

    Author(s): Grzegorz Szumski, Joanna Smogorzewska, Maciej Karwowski

    This article presents a meta-analysis that attempts to establish how the presence of students with special educational needs in the classroom impacts students without special educational needs. We meta-analyzed 47 studies that met the inclusion criteria, covering a total sample of almost 4 800 000 students. The overall effect was positive and statistically significant but weak, d = 0.12 (95% CI: 0.02, 0.23). A number of moderators, including the country of study, the manner of implementation (intervention studies versus regular school practice), the educational team composition, the level and type of disorders in students with special educational needs, and finally educational stage were examined. We discuss the findings in terms of assumptions and controversies surrounding the very concept of inclusive education.





  • Editorial Board / Publication Information
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20









  • EARLI Info for Edurev and JLI
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20









  • Advantages and challenges associated with augmented reality for education: A systematic review of the literature
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Murat Akçayır, Gökçe Akçayır

    This study presents a systematic review of the literature on augmented reality (AR) used in educational settings. We consider factors such as publication year, learner type (e.g., K-12, higher education, and adult), technologies in AR, and the advantages and challenges of using AR in educational settings. The full range of SSCI journals was surveyed and a total of 68 research articles were selected for analysis. The findings reveal an increase in the number of AR studies during the last four years. The most reported advantage of AR is that it promotes enhanced learning achievement. Some noted challenges imposed by AR are usability issues and frequent technical problems. We found several other challenges and numerous advantages of AR usage, which are discussed in detail. In addition, current gaps in AR research and needs in the field are identified, and suggestions are offered for future research.





  • Facilitating the social participation of pupils with special educational needs in mainstream schools: A review of school-based interventions
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Ariana Garrote, Rachel Sermier Dessemontet, Elisabeth Moser Opitz

    Inclusive education of pupils with special educational needs (SEN) has become a global trend. However, a considerable number of studies have shown that mere enrolment in mainstream classrooms is not enough to support the social participation of pupils with SEN. These children are at risk of experiencing difficulties in their involvement with peers at school. Thus, the question arises of how social participation can be fostered in mainstream classrooms. A systematic review of 35 studies was conducted to investigate which interventions are effective in inclusive mainstream preschool and elementary classrooms. Teaching interaction strategies to typically developing pupils, group activities in the academic context (cooperative learning and peer-tutoring), support groups for pupils with SEN, and training paraprofessionals to facilitate social interactions, were found to improve the social participation of pupils with SEN in general education classrooms. Nevertheless, there is need for more intervention studies implementing a variety of strategies and including different groups of pupils with SEN.





  • Exploring the value of peer feedback in online learning for the provider
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Esther van Popta, Marijke Kral, Gino Camp, Rob L. Martens, P. Robert-Jan Simons

    This paper reviews studies of peer feedback from the novel perspective of the providers of that feedback. The possible learning benefits of providing peer feedback in online learning have not been extensively studied. The goal of this study was therefore to explore the process of providing online peer feedback as a learning activity for the provider. We concluded that (1) providing online peer feedback has several potential learning benefits for the provider; (2) when providing online peer feedback, students use different cognitive processes; (3) the cognitive processes and the potential learning benefits can be realised when students use specific elements in the feedback they provide.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/1747938X

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *