Educational Research Review

  • We all reflect, but why? A systematic review of the purposes of reflection in higher education in social and behavioral sciences
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Laura Van Beveren, Griet Roets, Ann Buysse, Kris Rutten

    Reflection has gained increasing attention in theory, practice and education in social and behavioral sciences. In this study, we systematically review empirical research on the concept of reflection within educational contexts in social work, psychology and teacher education to discern trends regarding the educational purposes attributed to reflection. Based on an inductive analysis of 42 relevant studies, we found that reflection is attributed diverse -and sometimes opposing-educational purposes. Furthermore, we distinguished three dimensions to which these purposes are primarily related: a personal, interpersonal and socio-structural dimension. Our findings illustrate both a conceptual and an empirical complexity and openness of reflection as an educational notion. Based on these results, we argue for the explicit articulation of the value and theoretical bases underpinning one’s conceptualization of reflection when it is operationalized both in research and in practice.





  • A review of the relationship between parental involvement indicators and academic achievement
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Lisa Boonk, Hieronymus J.M. Gijselaers, Henk Ritzen, Saskia Brand-Gruwel

    This paper reviews the research literature on the relationship between parental involvement and students’ academic achievement with 75 studies published between 2003 and 2017. The results first present how individual parental involvement variables correlate with academic achievement based on an age-related classification. Then we move to a more profound review of the literature to determine which variables are moderating or mediating the relationship between parental involvement and academic achievement. Finally, we describe the advancements that were made with studies from the last decade with special focus on the construct of parental involvement. Parental involvement variables that show promises according to their correlations with academic achievement are: (a) reading at home, (b) parents that are holding high expectations/aspirations for their children’s academic achievement and schooling, (c) communication between parents and children regarding school, (d) parental encouragement and support for learning.





  • Effective differentiation Practices:A systematic review and meta-analysis of studies on the cognitive effects of differentiation practices in primary education
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Marjolein I. Deunk, Annemieke E. Smale-Jacobse, Hester de Boer, Simone Doolaard, Roel J. Bosker

    This systematic review gives an overview of the effects of differentiation practices on language and math performance in primary education, synthesizing the results of empirical studies (n = 21) on this topic since 1995. We extracted 78 effect sizes from the included studies. We found that using computerized systems as a differentiation tool and using differentiation as part of a broader program or reform had small to moderate positive effects on students’ performance. Between- or within-class homogeneous ability grouping had a small negative effect on low-ability students, but no effect on others. The finding that computer technology can be a useful tool to facilitate differentiated instruction is not covered in earlier reviews. Moreover, our findings emphasize that homogeneous ability grouping alone is not enough to guarantee differentiated instruction. This stresses the importance of embedding differentiation practices in a broader educational context.





  • Why do we know so little about the factors associated with gifted underachievement? A systematic literature review
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Sonia L.J. White, Linda J. Graham, Sabrina Blaas

    International comparisons of student achievement are generating renewed interest in the academic underperformance of intellectually gifted students, however, government responses to this problem are seldom grounded in empirical research evidence. This may be due to the quantity, type and quality of available research, which can make it difficult to distinguish factors that are associated with gifted underachievement. In this systematic review, we examine the methods used to identify both giftedness and gifted underachievement in empirical research investigating factors associated with gifted underachievement, and identify the factors this research associates with gifted underachievement. Findings reveal that most studies investigating factors associated with gifted underachievement do not employ research designs capable of distinguishing differences between gifted achievers and underachievers. Of the studies that did employ appropriate research designs, the methods used to identify giftedness and gifted underachievement differed widely and most focused on individual factors with much less focus on school-related factors.





  • Challenging beliefs about cultural diversity in education: A synthesis and critical review of trainings with pre-service teachers
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Sauro Civitillo, Linda P. Juang, Maja K. Schachner

    Teaching culturally diverse classrooms starts from embracing beliefs that recognise the strengths of cultural diversity. Research is needed to understand how teacher training contributes to shaping pre-service teachers’ beliefs about cultural diversity. Accordingly, the purpose of this review is to 1) provide a description of main components and contextual characteristics of teacher trainings targeting cultural diversity beliefs, 2) report the training effects, and 3) detail the methodological strengths and weaknesses of these studies. A total of 36 studies published between 2005 and 2015 that used a longitudinal assessment of cultural diversity beliefs were reviewed. The collective results of these studies indicate a large variance amongst trainings, with experiential learning shifting cultural diversity beliefs positively. However, existing studies have significant limitations in the study design and training evaluation that hinder their conclusions regarding internal and external validity and point towards new directions for future research.





  • The use of Latin-square designs in educational and psychological research
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): John T.E. Richardson

    A Latin square is a matrix containing the same number of rows and columns. The cell entries are a sequence of symbols inserted in such a way that each symbol occurs only once in each row and only once in each column. Fisher (1925) proposed that Latin squares could be useful in experimental designs for controlling the effects of extraneous variables. He argued that a Latin square should be chosen at random from the set of possible Latin squares that would fit a research design and that the Latin-square design should be carried through into the data analysis. Psychological researchers have advanced our appreciation of Latin-square designs, but they have made only moderate use of them and have not heeded Fisher’s prescriptions. Educational researchers have used them even less and are vulnerable to similar criticisms. Nevertheless, the judicious use of Latin-square designs is a powerful tool for experimental researchers.





  • Long-term effects of metacognitive strategy instruction on student academic performance: A meta-analysis
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Hester de Boer, Anouk S. Donker, Danny D.N.M. Kostons, Greetje P.C. van der Werf

    Meta-analyses have shown the positive effects of strategy instruction on student performance; however, little meta-analytical research has been conducted on its long-term effects. We examined the long-term effects of 48 metacognitive strategy instruction interventions on student academic performance. The results show a very small increase of the effect at long-term compared with the posttest effects. The instruction effect at posttest increased from Hedges’ g = 0.50 to 0.63 at follow-up test. Moderator analyses showed that low SES students benefited the most at long-term. Furthermore, instructions including the cognitive strategy ‘rehearsal’ had lower long-term effects compared to interventions without this component. Other specific strategies (within categories metacognitive, cognitive, management, or motivational) did not moderate the overall positive long-term effect of metacognitive strategy instructions. Particular attributes of the intervention –subject domain, measurement instrument, duration, time between posttest and follow-up test, and cooperation – neither had an impact on the follow-up effect.





  • The interplay between self-regulation in learning and cognitive load
    Publication date: June 2018
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 24

    Author(s): Tina Seufert

    Research on self-regulated learning and on cognitive load has been two of the most prominent and influential research lines in educational research during the last decades. However, both lines developed quite independently from one another. This paper aims to bridge both concepts in order to better understand self-regulation as well as cognitive affordances of complex and dynamic learning processes. In fact, most learning environments require learners to self-regulate their learning process. They have to set their goals and plan, use strategies and monitor their learning progress and if necessary they have to regulate, i.e. to adapt their learning behavior. However, in all these phases of self-regulation, learners need to invest cognitive and metacognitive resources in addition to dealing with the original learning task. The affordances of self-regulation thus will cause cognitive load. This paper analyzes the affordances in the different phases of self-regulated learning in terms of intrinsic, extraneous and germane load. As a conclusion, the interplay between different affordances of self-regulation and learners’ resources and aptitudes is described in an integrated model of self-regulation and cognitive load.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/1747938X

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *