Educational Research Review

  • Four key challenges to the design of blended learning: A systematic literature review
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Ruth Boelens, Bram De Wever, Michiel Voet

    The design of blended learning environments brings with it four key challenges: (1) incorporating flexibility, (2) stimulating interaction, (3) facilitating students’ learning processes, and (4) fostering an affective learning climate. Seeing that attempts to resolve these challenges are fragmented across the literature, a systematic review was performed. Starting from 640 sources, 20 studies on the design of blended learning environments were selected through a staged procedure based on the guidelines of the PRISMA statement, using predefined selection criteria. For each study, the instructional activities for dealing with these four challenges were analyzed by two coders. The results show that few studies offer learners control over the realization of the blend. Social interaction is generally stimulated through introductory face-to-face meetings, while personalization and monitoring of students’ learning progress is commonly organized through online instructional activities. Finally, little attention is paid to instructional activities that foster an affective learning climate.





  • Technology-enhanced mathematics instruction: A second-order meta-analysis of 30 years of research
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Jamaal Young

    It is important to assess the cumulative effects of technology on student achievement captured in the last 30 years of technologyenhanced mathematics instruction. Synthesizing the thousands of articles and gray literature on this subject is necessary but would require a considerable commitment of academic resources. A second-order metaanalysis or meta-analysis of meta-analyses is an alternative that is reasonable and effective. Thus, a second-order meta-analysis of 19 prior meta-analyses with minimum overlap between primary studies was conducted. The results represent 663 primary studies (approximately 141,733 participants) and 1,263 effect sizes. The random effects’ mean effect size of .38 was statistically significantly different from zero. The results provide a historical and contextualized summary of 30 years of meta-analytic research, which supports meta-analytic thinking and better interpretation of future effect sizes. Results indicate that technology function and study quality are major contributors to effect size variation. Specifically, computation enhancement technologies were most effective, while studies that examine combinations of enhancements were least effective. Implications for technology-enhanced mathematics instruction and meta-analytic research are provided.





  • Researchers under the spell of the arts: Two decades of using arts-based methods in community-based inquiry with vulnerable populations
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Sara Coemans, Karin Hannes

    In the last decade, we have witnessed a growing number of published articles featuring arts-based methods. These methods have been picked up by researchers interested in education in, through and for communities. This scoping review focuses on the use of arts-based methods in community-based research. It was undertaken to provide an overview of how these methods are applied in research practice. Different databases were systematically searched, covering literature published over twenty years (1993–2013). We identified different types of arts-based methods. We described the reported rationales, benefits and limitations, and presented a definition of arts-based methods as used in community-based inquiry. Four challenges were reported: the need to support researchers to explore alternative analytical approaches, the need for methodological reflections, the need to reflect on the voice-component in this work, and the need to push the boundaries of what counts as ‘the’ academic standard. Despite the challenges involved in working on the thin line between art and research, the learning curve it creates for researchers, its value in terms of creating understanding and its capacity to engage participants makes it a worthwhile endeavor to invest in.





  • Toward a set of design principles for mathematics flipped classrooms: A synthesis of research in mathematics education
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Chung Kwan Lo, Khe Foon Hew, Gaowei Chen

    This paper analyzed the journal publications of mathematics flipped classroom studies in K-12 and higher education contexts. We focused specifically on a set of flipped classroom studies in which pre-class instructional videos were provided prior to face-to-face class meetings. We examined the following four major issues: (a) the types of out-of-class and in-class instructional activities used, (b) the effect of flipped learning on student achievement, (c) the participant perceptions of flipped classroom benefits, and (d) the main challenges of flipped classroom implementations. A meta-analysis of 21 comparison studies showed an overall significant effect in favor of the flipped classroom over the traditional classroom for mathematics education (Hedges’ g = 0.298, 95% CI [0.16, 0.44]), with no evidence of publication bias. A broader research synthesis of 61 studies revealed that the flipped classroom approach benefited student learning in three main aspects: increasing in-class time for task/practice, integrating new knowledge with existing beliefs, and real-time feedback. The two most frequently reported flipped classroom challenges were students’ unfamiliarity with flipped learning and significant start-up effort on the part of instructors. We hence propose a set of design principles to help foster the transition to the flipped classroom and improve the out-of-class and in-class learning designs. This set of design principles can also provide a more focused agenda for future research to examine the effect of the flipped classroom approach on student learning and motivation.





  • Effects of self-assessment on self-regulated learning and self-efficacy: Four meta-analyses
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Ernesto Panadero, Anders Jonsson, Juan Botella

    This meta-analytic review explores the effects of self-assessment on students’ self-regulated learning (SRL) and self-efficacy. A total of 19 studies were included in the four different meta-analyses conducted with a total sample of 2305 students. The effects sizes from the three meta-analyses addressing effects on different measures of SRL were 0.23, 0.65, and 0.43. The effect size from the meta-analysis on self-efficacy was 0.73. In addition, it was found that gender (with girls benefiting more) and certain self-assessment components (such as self-monitoring) were significant moderators of the effects on self-efficacy. These results point to the importance of self-assessment interventions to promote students’ use of learning strategies and its effects on motivational variables such as self-efficacy.





  • Teaching creativity in art and design studio classes: A systematic literature review
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): R. Keith Sawyer

    It is increasingly important for educators to help students develop as creative individuals, and to prepare graduates to think creatively at work, in personal life, and in society. Many countries are working to transform schooling to lead to creative learning outcomes. And yet, very little is known about how to teach for creativity. This review was motivated by the belief that effective models of creative teaching and learning would be found in art and design educational practice. The goal of this systematic review is to synthesize empirical studies of the pedagogy used in art and design studio classes, from early years to university. A keyword search, followed by a filter using inclusion criteria, identified 65 peer-reviewed journal articles. A grounded theory analysis of these 65 articles identified eleven themes characterizing art and design pedagogy, grouped in three clusters: Pedagogical practices (5 themes), learning outcomes (4 themes), and assessment (2 themes).





  • The return of behaviourist epistemology: A review of learning outcomes studies
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Mari Murtonen, Hans Gruber, Erno Lehtinen

    Learning outcomes as a concept has encountered a revival since the beginning of the Bologna process in 1999. The concept itself has a longer history with its roots in the behaviourist tradition of the 1960s. The goal of this review is to study how the historical roots of learning outcomes are noted in current research articles since the launch of the Bologna process and whether the concept of learning outcomes is used critically or uncritically. The review of 90 articles shows that the behaviourist tradition is still evident in the 21st century research with 29% of the articles directly and 11% indirectly referring uncritically to the respective publications or to the behaviourist epistemology. Only a minority of the articles, i.e. 8%, was found to be critical towards the behaviourist meaning of learning outcomes.





  • Exploring high impact scholarship in research on student's evaluation of teaching (SET)
    Publication date: November 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 22

    Author(s): Pieter Spooren, Frederic Vandermoere, Raf Vanderstraeten, Koen Pepermans

    Student evaluation of teaching (SET) is the most common way of assessing teaching quality at universities. Since the introduction of SET procedures at the start of the previous century, thousands of research studies on the validity, reliability and utility of SET were written. By means of a citation analysis on journal articles included in Google Scholar, Scopus, and the Social Science Citation Index (Web of Science), this paper aims at mapping the high impact studies, the leading researchers, and the key journals in this research field. The results indicate that, although we find considerable overlap between the three databases, a number of high impact journal papers are not included in all three databases. Furthermore, the analysis reveals three main topics in the SET literature: the use of SET, validity issues concerning SET, and the construction and validation of SET instruments. Also, it is shown that many high impact studies were written by only a few researchers, with Herbert Marsh as the leading author. Although some of the most impactful studies date back to the 1960s, it’s coming of age situates in the seventies. Since then SET became increasingly visible. The high proportion (25%) of impactful articles since 2000 indeed suggests a trend of continuous growth in SET research. At the same time, the historical knowledge in the form of classic studies on SET lives on through the many citations in recent studies.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/1747938X

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Email
Facebook
Facebook
YouTube
YouTube
Pin It