Warning: ksort() expects parameter 1 to be array, object given in /home/rferrell63/robertferrell.net/wp-content/plugins/bbpress/includes/core/template-functions.php on line 316
Educational Research Review

Educational Research Review

  • Advantages and challenges associated with augmented reality for education: A systematic review of the literature
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Murat Akçayır, Gökçe Akçayır

    This study presents a systematic review of the literature on augmented reality (AR) used in educational settings. We consider factors such as publication year, learner type (e.g., K-12, higher education, and adult), technologies in AR, and the advantages and challenges of using AR in educational settings. The full range of SSCI journals was surveyed and a total of 68 research articles were selected for analysis. The findings reveal an increase in the number of AR studies during the last four years. The most reported advantage of AR is that it promotes enhanced learning achievement. Some noted challenges imposed by AR are usability issues and frequent technical problems. We found several other challenges and numerous advantages of AR usage, which are discussed in detail. In addition, current gaps in AR research and needs in the field are identified, and suggestions are offered for future research.





  • Facilitating the social participation of pupils with special educational needs in mainstream schools: A review of school-based interventions
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Ariana Garrote, Rachel Sermier Dessemontet, Elisabeth Moser Opitz

    Inclusive education of pupils with special educational needs (SEN) has become a global trend. However, a considerable number of studies have shown that mere enrolment in mainstream classrooms is not enough to support the social participation of pupils with SEN. These children are at risk of experiencing difficulties in their involvement with peers at school. Thus, the question arises of how social participation can be fostered in mainstream classrooms. A systematic review of 35 studies was conducted to investigate which interventions are effective in inclusive mainstream preschool and elementary classrooms. Teaching interaction strategies to typically developing pupils, group activities in the academic context (cooperative learning and peer-tutoring), support groups for pupils with SEN, and training paraprofessionals to facilitate social interactions, were found to improve the social participation of pupils with SEN in general education classrooms. Nevertheless, there is need for more intervention studies implementing a variety of strategies and including different groups of pupils with SEN.





  • Exploring the value of peer feedback in online learning for the provider
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Esther van Popta, Marijke Kral, Gino Camp, Rob L. Martens, P. Robert-Jan Simons

    This paper reviews studies of peer feedback from the novel perspective of the providers of that feedback. The possible learning benefits of providing peer feedback in online learning have not been extensively studied. The goal of this study was therefore to explore the process of providing online peer feedback as a learning activity for the provider. We concluded that (1) providing online peer feedback has several potential learning benefits for the provider; (2) when providing online peer feedback, students use different cognitive processes; (3) the cognitive processes and the potential learning benefits can be realised when students use specific elements in the feedback they provide.





  • Homework and students' achievement in math and science: A 30-year meta-analysis, 1986–2015
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Huiyong Fan, Jianzhong Xu, Zhihui Cai, Jinbo He, Xitao Fan

    In the current investigation, research conducted since 1986 were synthesized to examine the homework – achievement relationship in math/science, and to examine a range of factors that could have moderated this relationship. Our investigation revealed that there was an overall small and positive relationship between homework and academic achievement in math/science. Our investigation further revealed that the homework – achievement relationship in math/science was stronger for elementary and high school students than for middle school students. In addition, the homework – achievement relationship in math/science was shown to be the strongest in the studies involving US students, whereas it was the weakest in the studies involving Asian students. We discussed possible explanations for these and other findings, and the implications for future research directions.





  • When the music's over. Does music skill transfer to children's and young adolescents' cognitive and academic skills? A meta-analysis
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Giovanni Sala, Fernand Gobet

    Music training has been recently claimed to enhance children and young adolescents’ cognitive and academic skills. However, substantive research on transfer of skills suggests that far-transfer – i.e., the transfer of skills between two areas only loosely related to each other – occurs rarely. In this meta-analysis, we examined the available experimental evidence regarding the impact of music training on children and young adolescents’ cognitive and academic skills. The results of the random-effects models showed (a) a small overall effect size ( d ¯ = 0.16 ) ; (b) slightly greater effect sizes with regard to intelligence ( d ¯ = 0.35 ) and memory-related outcomes ( d ¯ = 0.34 ) ; and (c) an inverse relation between the size of the effects and the methodological quality of the study design. These results suggest that music training does not reliably enhance children and young adolescents’ cognitive or academic skills, and that previous positive findings were probably due to confounding variables.





  • Using sociometric techniques to assess the social impacts of inclusion: Some methodological considerations
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Elias Avramidis, Vasilis Strogilos, Katerina Aroni, Christina Thessalia Kantaraki

    In recent years, sociometric techniques have been increasingly used to assess friendship development in children with special educational needs integrated in regular educational settings. In this paper, the findings produced by different techniques are contrasted with a view to examining whether the variable findings reported can be attributed to the technique employed. The analysis revealed that peer nominations have been used to determine pupils’ social status and have overwhelmingly produced negative results. Peer ratings have been used to ascertain the level of acceptance pupils enjoy within their class network and have also produced negative results. Social Cognitive Mapping has been used to obtain information about the nature of social networks and the relations among peers and has produced mixed to positive results. As such, Social Cognitive Mapping could be viewed as a more robust approach that addresses more thoroughly the complexities of young children’s social relations than the other two classic sociometric techniques. The paper concludes with highlighting methodological challenges surrounding the application of sociometric techniques and advocates their embedding within innovative multi-method research designs.





  • Career consequences of transnational educational mobility: A systematic literature review
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Stine Waibel, Heiko Rüger, Andreas Ette, Lenore Sauer

    Transnational educational mobility (TEM) – stays abroad between and during basic and post-secondary education – has become increasingly popular in advanced societies. In this systematic research review, we synthesize findings of existing empirical studies on the potential career benefits of educational mobility. Our extensive search procedure yielded 65 documents that were reviewed with respect to three vertical career outcomes: career planning skills, transition into employment, and professional status or income. Results reveal a moderate positive effect of educational mobility on income after graduation. While individuals themselves perceive a connection between their transnational mobility practices and subsequent job search success, objective effect assessments disprove assumptions about faster school to work transitions. Individuals also perceive a positive impact of TEM on career planning skills, but studies using more elaborate methods report no impact. The review also buttresses the relevance of individual and contextual factors as moderators of the career impact of educational mobility.





  • Intercultural relationship development at university: A systematic literature review from an ecological and person-in-context perspective
    Publication date: February 2017
    Source:Educational Research Review, Volume 20

    Author(s): Kazuhiro Kudo, Simone Volet, Craig Whitsed

    For more than four decades, issues pertaining to the development of intercultural relationships between international and domestic students in university settings have received scholarly attention. However, there appears to be lack of research exploring the extent to, and the manner in which the individual and environmental dimensions interact with one another to co-create this development. This review addresses this gap by scrutinising English-language refereed journal articles from an ecological and person-in-context perspective. The review, involving a constructionist thematic analysis of systematically searched and screened papers, identified the few empirical studies from that perspective, the vague operationalisation of intercultural relationship development, and the methodological limitations of the empirical work. It also generated content-related themes of the individual–environmental interactions in the development of intercultural relationships. The review concludes by suggesting multiple areas of inquiry that warrant further empirical investigations, and by calling for the amplification and refinement of the research methodologies.





http://rss.sciencedirect.com/publication/science/1747938X

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *